Archaeology: AAAS announces leading researchers elected as 2020 fellows

Photo: Each AAAS Fellow receives an official certificate and a rosette pin in gold and blue, colors symbolizing science and engineering
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Credit Image: Courtesy of AAAS

Nearly 500 members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science have earned the lifetime distinction of AAAS Fellow.

AAAS Fellows are elected each year by their peers serving on the Council of AAAS, the organization’s member-run governing body. The title recognizes important contributions to STEM disciplines, including pioneering research, leadership within a given field, teaching and mentoring, fostering collaborations, and advancing public understanding of science.

A virtual induction ceremony for the 489 newly elected Fellows will take place on Feb. 13, 2021, the Saturday following the AAAS Annual Meeting. The honorees will receive official certificates and rosette pins in gold and blue, colors symbolizing science and engineering, by mail.

The tradition of electing AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Since then, the recognition has gone to thousands of distinguished scientists, such as inventor Thomas Edison, elected in 1878, sociologist W. E. B. Du Bois (1905), anthropologist Margaret Mead (1934), computer scientist Grace Hopper (1963), physicist Steven Chu (2000), and astronaut Ellen Ochoa (2012). The 2020 group contains members of each of AAAS’s 24 sections.

AAAS Fellowship often precedes other accolades in long and impactful careers. Two of the 2020 Nobel laureates announced last month, Jennifer Doudna and Charles Rice, are AAAS Fellows. Doudna and a research collaborator received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editor, while Rice and two colleagues received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for contributions to the discovery of the virus that causes Hepatitis C.

In order to be considered for the rank of Fellow, a AAAS member must be nominated by three previously elected Fellows, the steering group of a AAAS section, or the organization’s CEO. Nominations go through a two-step review process, with steering groups reviewing nominations in their section and the AAAS Council voting on the final list.

AAAS leadership has long encouraged its sections and Council to consider diversity when nominating and selecting Fellows, and the association has taken recent steps toward solidifying its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI).

Last month, AAAS published a report that compiles demographic data on the organization’s honorary Fellows, Science and Technology Policy Fellows, award winners, governing bodies, and journal authors and reviewers. The data show that the policy fellows are roughly as diverse as the broader scientific enterprise, while women and racial minorities are underrepresented as elected Fellows. Of note, policy fellows apply to participate in the program, while elected Fellows receive the honor through a nomination process. AAAS has committed to releasing updated data each year to inform its DEI initiatives.

In September 2018, the AAAS Council adopted a revocation policy that allows the organization to rescind honorary Fellowship if warranted. The policy is intended to combat sexual misconduct, racial discrimination, and other breaches of professional ethics and scientific integrity.

The full list of 2020 Fellows, below, will be published in the Nov. 27 issue of Science.

SECTION ON AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND RENEWABLE RESOURCES

Ann M. Bartuska Resources for the Future: For her national leadership in forestry, ecosystem management, and agriculture, where she has championed sustainable, science-based research.

Carl Bernacchi U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service: For outstanding contributions towards understanding photosynthesis from molecular to global scales.

Amy O. Charkowski Colorado State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant pathology, particularly for translating discoveries about the molecular basis of soft rot diseases to prevent crop losses.

Clarice J. Coyne U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service: For international leadership in legume germplasm conservation, and contributions to the public understanding, global food security, and improved nutritional value of legumes.

Geoffrey E. Dahl University of Florida: For accomplishments in lactation biology and environmental physiology, particularly for his research demonstrating developmental programming of postnatal function caused by late-gestation heat stress.

Roch E. Gaussoin University of Nebraska-Lincoln: For distinguished contributions and service to the agronomic sciences, particularly in turfgrass and landscape systems, academic administration, and communicating science to the public.

Patrick M. Hayes Oregon State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant breeding with particular reference to barley in the areas of low temperature physiology, disease resistance, malting quality, and variety development.

TJ Higgins CSIRO Agriculture and Food (Australia): For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular plant science, particularly using gene technology to transfer useful traits to grain legumes for food security.

Nancy Collins Johnson Northern Arizona University: For distinguished contributions to the field of soil microbial ecology, with particular reference to advancing knowledge of the abundance, diversity, and functioning of mycorrhizal fungi.

Shibu Jose University of Missouri: For distinguished contributions to agroforestry science, particularly in studying interspecific interactions for resources that define sustainability and ecosystem services of these alternative production systems.

Daniel Kliebenstein University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions in the field of plant metabolomics and quantitative variation, and for exceptional service on his home campus and to the scientific community.

Rosemary Loria University of Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of the molecular basis of bacterial diseases of plants, particularly regarding genetics and biochemistry of plant pathogenic Actinobacteria.

Shailaja K. Mani Baylor College of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to molecular and cellular neuroscience focused on molecular transcriptional regulation of steroid hormone receptors, signal transduction pathways and role of the microbiome.

Rafael Muñoz-Carpena University of Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of hydrological water quality modelling in agricultural systems, particularly for mechanistic evaluation of agricultural best practices for water protection.

David D. Myrold Oregon State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of soil science, particularly for advancing the understanding of soil nitrogen cycling and the functioning of soil microbial communities.

K. Raja Reddy Mississippi State University: For distinguished contributions to the field environmental plant physiology and agricultural systems modeling and applications.

Jean Ristaino North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the science of plant pathology, particularly the population biology of historic plant disease outbreaks.

Jeanne Romero-Severson University of Notre Dame: For pioneering DNA marker technologies applied extremely successfully to forestry genetics and conservation.

Pablo Juan Ross University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions to the fields of developmental and stem cell biology, particularly for studies of preimplantation embryo epigenetics and developing livestock embryonic stem cells.

Jennifer L. Tank University of Notre Dame: For distinguished contributions to aquatic biogeochemistry, with particular reference to carbon and nitrogen transformations and transport in agricultural landscapes and its impact on water quality.

William F. Tracy University of Wisconsin – Madison: Dr. William Tracy is national leader in plant breeding and germplasm, who has trained a generation of breeders and communicated breeding’s importance to the public.

SECTION ON ANTHROPOLOGY

Margaret W. Conkey University of California, Berkeley: For distinguished contributions to the field of archaeology, particularly theoretical work on the role of art in ancient human evolution and gender studies in archaeology.

Anne Grauer Loyola University Chicago: For distinguished contributions to the field of biological anthropology, particularly to the development of paleopathology as a means of understanding social life in the past.

Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to biological anthropology, particularly using dental hard tissues to advance understanding of growth and biological relationships in non-human primates and fossil hominins.

Edward B. Liebow American Anthropological Association: For distinguished contributions to the field of applied anthropology, and particularly for exemplary administration of professional societies and non-profit research and policy institutions.

J. Terrence McCabe University of Colorado Boulder: For distinguished contributions to anthropology, particularly for understanding how people adapt to arid rangelands of East Africa, and how they cope with changing socioeconomic conditions.

Denise Fay-Shen Su Cleveland Museum of Natural History: For notable contributions to the paleoecology of early hominins, descriptions of primate taxa, and overwhelming dedication to make science accessible to all through outreach.

SECTION ON ASTRONOMY

Nancy Susan Brickhouse Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics: For outstanding contributions toward increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion in astronomy; for leadership in academia and professional societies to broaden participation for underrepresented groups.

John E. Carlstrom University of Chicago: For distinguished contributions to studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background at millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelengths and for leadership in the associated technical development projects.

Sean Carroll California Institute of Technology: For distinguished contributions to cosmology, gravity, and dark matter research, as well as exceptional contributions in communicating and promoting science to the public.

Timothy Heckman Johns Hopkins University: For distinguished contributions to the fields of galaxy evolution and supermassive black holes, and the relationship between the two.

Paul Martini The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to the development of astronomical instrumentation, and the evolution of black holes and galaxies.

Norman Murray Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics: For theoretical work providing key insights into a broad range of astrophysical topics encompassing planetary science, star formation, galaxy evolution, and active galactic nuclei.

Joan R. Najita NSF’s NOIRLab: For distinguished contributions to astrophysics, particularly for theoretical modeling of protoplanetary disks and winds and the applications of these models to observations of young stars.

Liese van Zee Indiana University: For distinguished service as chair of the National Academy’s Committee on Radio Frequencies and for incisive contributions to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

Risa Wechsler Stanford University: For scientific contributions and leadership of large programs in cosmology and large scale structure to resolve the nature of dark matter and energy.

Ellen G. Zweibel University of Wisconsin-Madison: For distinguished contributions to quantify the role of magnetic fields in shaping the cosmos on all scales.

SECTION ON ATMOSPHERIC AND HYDROSPHERIC SCIENCE

Ghassem R. Asrar Universities Space Research Association: For outstanding research contributions to remote sensing of biosphere-atmosphere interactions, his scientific leadership and service to the Earth and Space community with great societal impact.

Elizabeth Boyer Penn State: For significant advances in ecohydrology, water quality, and the scientific underpinning for water management.

Deborah Bronk Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences: For substantial research advances on the marine nitrogen cycle and leadership in the ocean science research community.

Rong Fu University of California, Los Angeles: For seminal contributions to the understanding of rainfall and ecosystem interactions, and the scientific application for improving societal drought preparedness at regional scale.

Isaac Held Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University: For major scientific advances in atmosphere science, climate, and geophysical fluid dynamics.

Forrest M. Hoffman Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For distinction in developing, comparing, and evaluating Earth system models with an emphasis on global biogeochemical cycles and feedbacks to the climate system.

William K.M. Lau University of Maryland: For profound contributions to the understanding of atmospheric low-frequency oscillations, monsoon dynamics, aerosol-monsoon interaction, and hydroclimate variability and change, through original data analysis and modeling.

Zhengyu Liu The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of climate dynamics, particularly in pioneering data-model experiments to explore the physics of present and past climate variability.

Natalie Mahowald Cornell University: For pioneering and sustained work on the role of aerosols in global biogeochemistry and climate.

Sally McFarlane U.S. Department of Energy: For extensive scientific professional service to AAAS, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the climate and atmospheric radiation dynamics communities.

Jerry Schubel Aquarium of the Pacific (Retired): For sustained contributions to ocean research, conservation, and public education.

Patricia L. Wiberg University of Virginia: For distinguished contributions to understanding the causes and consequences of sediment movements in aquatic systems.

SECTION ON BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Mary Catherine Aime Purdue University: For distinguished contributions to the field of mycology, especially discovery and evolutionary studies of fungi, professional service, and mentoring a diverse assemblage of students.

Suresh K. Alahari Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions in cancer research and teaching, with a focus on signal transduction.

Gladys Alexandre University of Tennessee, Knoxville: For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular microbiology, particularly for characterizing bacterial sensing and chemotaxis signaling in beneficial plant-microbe associations.

Craig Reece Allen University of Nebraska-Lincoln: For distinguished contributions to resilience theory and its application to conservation and resource management, as well as the advancement of science through teaching and service.

Sonia M. Altizer University of Georgia: For distinguished contributions to the field of ecology, particularly understanding how animal movement and environmental change affect pathogen spread and evolution.

Swathi Arur The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For discovery of Dicer1 phosphorylation by RAS/ERK signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans and implications for human fertility and cancer metastasis.

Alison M. Bell University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For pioneering contributions to the field of animal behavior, particularly for conceptual and empirical advances in the mechanism and evolution of animal personality.

Elizabeth T. Borer University of Minnesota: For distinguished contributions to the field of ecology, particularly to nutrient dynamics of grassland ecosystems.

Lisa Brooks National Human Genome Research Institute: For distinguished contributions to human genomic sciences in shepherding the Human HapMap Project and the 1000 Genomes Project to successful completion.

John Michael Burke University of Georgia: For outstanding contributions to the field of evolutionary genomics and domestication of crops using sunflower as a model.

George A. Calin The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For his landmark discovery linking human diseases and miRNAs, specifically downregulation of miRNAs in patients with leukemias; pioneered the concept of microRNAs involvement in neurogenesis.

Andrew G. Campbell Brown University: For research in infectious diseases in neglected populations, administrative leadership, and service to increase the full participation of all in science.

Alice Y. Cheung University of Massachusetts Amherst: For contributions to understanding the molecular and cellular biology of fertilization and polarized cell growth in plants.

Anita S. Chong University of Chicago: For distinguished and pioneering contributions to the immunology related to organ transplantation, tolerance, and immuno-suppressive drug action.

Gregory P. Copenhaver University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant molecular genetics, particularly for novel insights into plant reproductive biology.

Leah E. Cowen University of Toronto (Canada): For distinguished contributions in the field of microbial genomics, particularly for using functional and chemical genomic analyses to identify vulnerabilities in fungal pathogens.

Dana Crawford Case Western Reserve University: For distinguished contributions in pioneering phenome-wide association studies and in developing and leading genetic studies in under-represented minority populations.

Charles F. Delwiche University of Maryland, College Park: For distinguished contributions to molecular systematics, particularly algal evolution and biodiversity.

Diana M. Downs University of Georgia: For distinguished contributions to the field of bacterial metabolism and physiology, particularly metabolic pathway integration, stress.

Jeffrey Dukes Purdue University: For distinguished contributions to community and ecosystem ecology, particularly responses by invasive species, communities and ecosystems to environmental change.

Peter Dunn University of Wisconsin -Milwaukee: For distinguished contributions to evolutionary ecology, particularly sexual selection, mate choice and impacts of climate change in birds.

Jonathan Eisen University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions to evolutionary biology, genomics and microbiology, for advancing gender equity within STEM fields, for science communication, and for service to the profession.

Eva Engvall Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute: For distinguished contributions to molecular biology, particularly the development of the ELISA technique and advancing our understanding of parasitology and tissue biochemistry.

Valerie Eviner University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions to community and ecosystem ecology, particularly the interactions among soils, plants, community structure and ecosystem processes.

Philip Martin Fearnside INPA – National Institute of Amazonian Research (Brazil): For distinguished contributions to tropical ecology and environmental services, particularly the effects, processes and drivers of Amazonian deforestation.

Gloria Cruz Ferreira University of South Florida: For distinguished contributions to the field of iron-heme metabolism, particularly using enzymology and spectroscopy to study heme synthesis and the molecular basis of heme-related disorders.

J. Patrick Fitch Los Alamos National Laboratory: For distinguished research and science leadership in the application of genomics, host-pathogen biology, and biosafety to bioforensic analysis and threat characterization in biodefense.

John W. Fitzpatrick Cornell University: For advances in understanding cooperative birds, for leadership in conservation and citizen science, for co-founding the flagship birding platform, eBird.

Christopher Francklyn University of Vermont: For paradigm shifting discoveries that link control of protein synthesis with biological mechanisms and regulatory compromises in cancer, blindness and deafness.

Serita Frey University of New Hampshire: For distinguished contributions to microbial and ecosystem ecology, particularly the effect of anthropogenic stressors on soil microbial communities and microbial-mediated carbon and nitrogen cycles.

Andrea L. Graham Princeton University: For distinguished contributions to the field of ecological and evolutionary immunology.

Michael William Gray Dalhousie University (Canada): For distinguished contributions to the field of molecular evolution, particularly in the area of endosymbiosis, organelle origins, molecular biology and genomics.

Karen Jeanne Guillemin University of Oregon: For using genetically tractable animal systems to uncover mechanisms that hosts and their microbial communities use to shape each other during development and disease states.

Paul Hardin Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the field of biological rhythms, particularly for discovering molecular feedback loops that govern circadian timekeeping in all eukaryotes.

Stacey Lynn Harmer University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions to the field of chronobiology, particularly mechanisms by which circadian rhythms regulate plant growth.

Jessica Hellmann University of Minnesota: For distinguished contributions to and leadership in the fields of conservation biology and sustainability science, particularly organismal and societal adaptation to climate change.

Nancy Marie Hollingsworth Stony Brook University: For distinguished contributions to the field of Genetics, particularly the discovery of genes important for meiotic chromosome segregation.

Charles Hong University of Maryland School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions in combining high-throughput chemical screening with developmental genomic investigations to discover the role of PI3K in artery-vein specification.

Laura Foster Huenneke Northern Arizona University: For service to the discipline of ecology; to university education; and to advancing our understanding of relationships among biodiversity, ecosystem function and invasive species.

Mark O. Huising University of California, Davis: For fundamental contributions to the elucidation of the mechanisms and causes of Type 1 Diabetes.

Travis Huxman University of California, Irvine: For distinguished contributions to the field of physiological plant ecology, particularly functional trait evolution and influence in ecosystems under global change.

Kenneth D. Irvine Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: For distinguished contributions to the field of developmental biology, particularly for understanding mechanisms that control organ growth.

Ursula Jakob University of Michigan: For seminal discoveries of how reactive oxygen species play pivotal roles in a range of biological processes and for method development to identify redox-regulated proteins/pathways.

Janet K. Jansson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to the field of microbial ecology, particularly to understanding complex microbiomes in soil, sediment and the human gut.

Susan Kaech Salk Institute for Biological Studies: For distinguished contributions to immunology by identifying genes and signaling molecules that generate memory T-cells during acute and chronic infections and their suppression by tumors.

Patricia Kiley University of Wisconsin – Madison: For distinguished contributions to understanding mechanisms that regulate E.coli’s lifestyle in different oxygen environments, specifically how transcription factors exploit Fe-S metal centers for oxygen responses.

Joan Kobori Agouron Institute: For exemplary contributions to the fields of microbial oceanography, geobiology, and structural biology through funding research, conferences/workshops, training and fieldwork as Program Director, Agouron Institute.

Barbara N. Kunkel Washington University in St. Louis: For important discoveries of how the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae uses multiple strategies to manipulate its plant host’s hormone biology to promote pathogenesis and disease.

Armand Michael Kuris University of California, Santa Barbara: For important investigations of the ecological role of infectious agents in ecosystems, for practical applications including control of schistosomiasis in Africa and mentoring diverse students.

Pui-Yan Kwok University of California, San Francisco: For distinguished contributions to the development of human genomic technologies for assaying genome variation in all forms, and genome discoveries for human disease.

Douglas Landis Michigan State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of ecology, particularly for elucidating the role of landscape structure in regulating insect biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Samuel J. Landry Tulane University School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the field of structural and molecular immunology, particularly for the analysis of protein immunogenicity and CD4+ T-cell epitope prediction.

Eaton Edwards Lattman University at Buffalo, the State University of New York (Retired): For distinguished contributions in scholarship, education and leadership to the field of molecular biophysics and structural biology.

Rodney L. Levine National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute /NIH: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of the effects of oxidative modifications of proteins.

Han Liang The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For his pioneering integrative analysis of cancer genomic data and development of related bioinformatic tools to improve delivery of precision cancer medicine.

Senjie Lin University of Connecticut: For distinguished contributions to the field of marine genomics and ecology, particularly elucidating dinoflagellate biology in harmful algal blooms, coral symbiosis, and adaptation to eutrophication.

Hiten D. Madhani University of California, San Francisco: For distinguished contributions to the fields of molecular biology and genetics, particularly for developing fungal systems to uncover mechanisms of chromatin modifications and RNA splicing.

Jennifer B.H. Martiny University of California, Irvine: For distinguished contributions to the fields of environmental microbiology and microbiome research, particularly using the study of microbial populations to understand climate change.

John McCutcheon Arizona State University: For exceptional contributions to our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of symbiosis, in particular, several partner systems with conflict.

Rima McLeod University of Chicago: For distinguished contributions to understanding the medical consequences of Toxoplasma gondii infection, the molecular mechanisms contributing to these consequences, and potential treatments.

Paula McSteen University of Missouri-Columbia: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant genetics, particularly the role of the hormone, auxin, in maize reproductive development.

Matthew Meyerson Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School: For distinguished contributions and pioneering genomic discoveries in cancer biology.

Constance Millar U.S. Forest Service: For distinguished contributions to the fields of forest genetics and resource conservation, particularly science-based ecosystem management under climate change, and for creating lasting scientific networks.

Lisa A. Miller University of California, Davis: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of the health effects of air pollution and environmentally induced lung injuries.

Beronda L. Montgomery Michigan State University: For distinguished contributions to plant biology and microbiology, particularly using photobiological analyses to investigate physiological and morphogenic adaptation of photosynthetic organisms.

Tuli Mukhopadhyay Indiana University: For distinguished contributions to the field of virology, particularly in structure and assembly of arthropod-borne viruses.

Katsuhiko (Katsu) Murakami Penn State : For outstanding contributions in the field of structural biology, particularly the role of RNA polymerase in prokaryotic gene regulation.

William J. Murphy Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the field of comparative genomics, particularly for mammalian chromosome and felid evolution advances.

Rama Natarajan City of Hope National Medical Center: For distinguished contributions to the field of diabetes and its vascular complications, particularly for studies showing the roles of epigenetics and non-coding RNAs.

Nicholas E. Navin The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: For seminal contributions to understanding clonal evolution in breast cancer and inventing the first single-cell DNA sequencing methods, establishing the field of single cell genomics.

Anthony V. Nicola Washington State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of herpes simplex virus biology, particularly for herpesviral entry into host cells.

Basil Nikolau Iowa State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of biochemistry, particularly for the characterization of novel metabolic processes.

E. Michael Ostap University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the fields of biophysics and biochemistry, particularly for using single-molecule and biochemical techniques to study cytoskeletal motors.

Franklin Wayne Outten University of South Carolina: For distinguished research contributions deciphering the mechanisms for iron sulfur cluster biogenesis, its regulation and its roles in microbial physiology and stress responses.

Abraham Palmer University of California, San Diego: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of model systems and human genetics of addiction, substance abuse, neuropsychiatric and behavioral traits.

Maria C. Pellegrini W.M. Keck Foundation: For proactive administrative service at the highest levels of academic and philanthropic institutions and for strong advocacy for advancement of interdisciplinary science.

Len Pennacchio Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: For distinguished and pioneering contributions to understanding how the non-coding genome works to regulate gene expression and to affect normal mammalian development and disease.

Philip S. Perlman Howard Hughes Medical Institute: For advancing the missions of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute including graduate training for research and for research on gene splicing.

James Pinckney University of South Carolina: For distinguished contributions to estuarine and marine ecology, particularly the role of benthic primary production in ecosystem processes and the mechanisms regulating phytoplankton diversity.

Judith A. Potashkin Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science: For identification of dysregulated pathways and molecular networks shared between Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases and for identification of new biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease and dementia.

P. Hemachandra Reddy Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center: For pioneering contributions to the fields of Alzheimer’s disease and mitochondrial neurobiology, particularly in discovering key role of mitochondria in neurodegenerative diseases and their treatment.

William S. Reznikoff Marine Biological Laboratory: For deciphering the molecular details of transposition by studying a model bacterial transposon.

Joan T. Richtsmeier Penn State: For development of imaging and genetic approaches that have elucidated contributions of growth pattern to morphology, with an emphasis on craniofacial growth patterns in primates.

Taylor Henry Ricketts University of Vermont: For distinguished contributions to the fields of ecology and conservation, particularly for quantifying ecosystem services and using that understanding to inform management efforts.

Isidore Rigoutsos Thomas Jefferson University: For the Teiresias algorithm for discovery of patterns in data streams and the Berger-Rigoutsos algorithm, a standard technique for handling clustering in adaptive mesh refinement.

Charles Rock St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital: For cutting edge research on bacterial lipid metabolism, the results of which have advanced the promise of fatty acid synthesis inhibitors as new bacterial antibiotics.

Antonis Rokas Vanderbilt University: For distinguished contributions to the field of evolutionary biology, particularly combining phylogenetic and molecular approaches to study the evolution of fungal and animal genomes.

Jeffrey Ross-Ibarra University of California, Davis: For the application of evolutionary approaches to understand the processes and mechanisms underlying adaptation, domestication, and improvement in maize and its wild relatives.

James A. Roth Iowa State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of immunology, particularly for control of infectious diseases in food producing animals.

Daniel Schaid Mayo Clinic: For distinguished contributions to human statistical genetics and the genetics of prostate cancer and other common diseases and traits.

G. Eric Schaller Dartmouth University: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant signaling, particularly for novel insights into plant hormone biology.
Jeremiah Scharf Massachusetts General Hospital: For distinguished contributions to genetic and genomic studies of Tourette Syndrome.

Karen Sears University of California, Los Angeles: For distinguished contributions to the field of biology, particularly the developmental mechanisms driving morphologic diversification in mammals.

Mark Seielstad University of California, San Francisco: For distinguished contributions to the genetics of type 2 diabetes, the genetics of immune and inflammatory diseases, and population genetics studies in diverse human populations.

Peter Setlow UConn Health: For distinguished contributions to knowledge about spores of Bacillales, including their formation, resistance, killing and germination.

Sally Shaywitz Yale University: For distinguished contributions to our understanding of the biological basis and natural history of dyslexia and communicating these discoveries to the public.

Alan Shuldiner University of Maryland School of Medicine: For distinguished contributions and pioneering efforts in genetic studies of the Amish for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and pharmacogenomics.

Nathan Michael Springer University of Minnesota: For distinguished contributions to genomics and epigenetics of crop plants, and their impact on variation of gene expression.

Jason E. Stajich University of California, Riverside: For distinguished contributions at the interface of computational, genomic and evolutionary biology, using integrative approaches to study how fungi and other microorganisms evolve.

James V. Staros University of Massachusetts Amherst: For distinguished contributions in cell biology on the mechanisms by which binding of polypeptide hormones to their surface receptors are transduced into signals.

David Johnston Stewart Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: For helping advance biomedical research across the world through his outstanding leadership of the Meetings and Courses programs at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

Joel A. Swanson University of Michigan Medical School: For distinguished contributions to the field of cell biology, particularly for advancing our understanding of how cells organize their cytoplasm for spatially organized activities.

Rick L. Tarleton University of Georgia: For distinguished contributions to the field of biological sciences, particularly for his research contributions and leadership to control Chagas Disease.

Nektarios Tavernarakis Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas / University of Crete Medical (Greece): For distinguished contributions to the fields of aging, neuroscience, mitochondrial biology, cell death and autophagy, and leadership in developing C. elegans as a model system.

Eric W. Triplett University of Florida: For distinguished contributions in biology, particularly microbial ecology, metagenomics, and host-microbe interactions, and for increasing access of underrepresented minorities to STEM education.

Geoffrey C. Trussell Northeastern University: For distinguished contributions integrating ecology and evolution to understand the functional role of species in ecological communities.

Walter Reinhart Tschinkel Florida State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of experimental behavioral ecology and sociobiology, particularly chemical ecology, sociometry, sociogenesis and unraveling the complex nest architecture in ants.

Kan Wang Iowa State University: For advances in genetic engineering in plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.
Joy K. Ward Case Western Reserve University: For helping us understand the impact of rising carbon dioxide concentrations on the development, physiology, and growth of plants.

Vassie Ware Lehigh University: For contributions to understanding ribosomes and for outstanding initiatives in undergraduate science education.

Stephen T. Warren Emory University School of Medicine: For seminal discoveries identifying the gene responsible for fragile X syndrome in humans, characterizing the first trinucleotide repeat mutation and paving the way toward treatments.

Wyeth W. Wasserman BC Children’s Hospital /University of British Columbia (Canada): For distinguished contributions to the field of computational biology and genetics, particularly for the bioinformatics analysis of cis-regulatory sequences controlling gene transcription.

Daniel J. Wozniak The Ohio State University: For contributions to defining patho-adaptive processes and evolution of bacteria during infection in the context of biofilms and animal models of chronic infection.

Jin-Rong Xu Purdue University: For distinguished contributions to the field of plant-fungal interactions, particularly fungal genes important for pathogenesis.

Soojin Yi Georgia Tech: For advances in epigenetics and evolutionary genomics and how they impact our understanding of evolution.

Havva Fitnat Yildiz University of California, Santa Cruz: For distinguished contributions to the field of microbiology, particularly for study of bacterial signal transduction pathways and molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation.

Fanxiu Zhu Florida State University: For advances in our understanding of viral evasion of host antiviral innate immune responses, signaling pathways, and viral genes in the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus.

Lee Zou Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center/ Harvard Medical School: For distinguished contributions to the fields of biochemistry and cancer, particularly for studies on the maintenance of genome stability.

SECTION ON CHEMISTRY

José R. Almirall Florida International University: For distinguished contributions to the field of forensic chemistry, particularly for efforts to standardize approaches in the detection and analysis of drugs, explosives and materials.

Rohit Bhargava University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For pioneering contributions to chemical imaging, including infrared spectroscopic imaging theory, development of instrumentation, and its applications to realize all-digital cancer pathology.

Paul V. Braun University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For distinguished contributions to the field of materials chemistry, particularly for new pathways for synthesizing high energy density Li-ion battery materials and 3D structured optics.

Joan Blanchette Broderick Montana State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of bioinorganic chemistry, particularly for elucidating the novel chemistry of iron-sulfur clusters in biological radical initiation.

Felix (Phil) N. Castellano North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the fields of solar energy conversion, photochemistry, and photophysics, particularly for developing photochemical upconversion and strategies for manipulating excited state behavior.

David E. Chavez Los Alamos National Laboratory: For distinguished contributions to the field of energetic materials, particularly the development of highly energetic, fundamentally novel and environmentally friendly materials important to national security.

Kelsey D. Cook National Science Foundation: For research and service at interfaces among disciplines and sectors; and for work advancing science and science policy from universities through the White House.

Yi Cui Stanford University: For his outstanding contributions on materials chemistry for energy and the environment, particularly on the next generation of batteries.

Wibe A. de Jong Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: For seminal contributions in advancing scientific computing through the development of scientific tools and approaches used worldwide, enabling advancement in the chemical sciences.

William Dichtel Northwestern University: For distinguished contributions to the fields of organic and polymer chemistry, particularly for the synthesis and applications of two-dimensional polymers and porous polymer networks.

Vishva Dixit Genentech, Inc.: For pioneering studies defining the biochemical framework illuminating many of the key components of the cell death pathway.

Paul J. Dyson Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (Switzerland): For distinguished contributions to the field of organometallic chemistry, particularly for the development of sustainable processes.

Laura Gagliardi University of Chicago: For her outstanding accomplishments in developing and applying quantum mechanical electronic structure methods to multi-configurational problems in bonding, catalysis, and inorganometallic chemistry.

Jiaxing Huang Northwestern University: For distinguished contributions to the field of materials, particularly for the synthesis and processing of colloidal nanomaterials and their new applications for better living.

Prashant K. Jain University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For distinguished contributions to the field of nanomaterial chemistry leading to atomistic understanding of artificial photosynthesis, multielectron transfer, catalysis and phase transitions.

Phillip E. Klebba Kansas State University: For distinguished contributions to the understanding of the membrane transport mechanisms of bacteria relevant to their practical applications in human and health.

Kenneth L. Knappenberger Penn State: For distinguished contributions to the understanding of the electronic and optical properties of metal nanostructures through the use of ultrafast spectroscopy.

Yamuna Krishnan University of Chicago: For the development of DNA-based fluorescent reporters and quantitative imaging of the ionic and chemical contents of sub-cellular organelles in live cells and animals.

Jason S. Lewis Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: For his ground-breaking work in molecular imaging and radiochemistry and on the clinical translation of novel oncological imaging agents.

Hongbin Li University of British Columbia (Canada): For distinguished contributions to the field of single molecule biophysical chemistry, particularly for force spectroscopy studies on protein mechanics and protein folding/unfolding dynamics.

David R. Liu Harvard University: For pioneering advances such as base editing and DNA-encoded libraries that creatively integrate chemistry, evolution, and molecular biology to impact medicine and the life sciences.

Tianbo Liu University of Akron: For fundamental contributions to the development of the field of macro ionic solutions, which fill the gap between simple ions and colloids. / 2 Against

Tadeusz (‘Ted’) Franciszek Molinski University of California, San Diego: For his insightful and highly creative contributions to the field of marine natural products, including the innovation of new conformational methods, synthetic transformations and spectroscopic tools.

Janet R. Morrow University at Buffalo, the State University of New York: For distinguished contributions to the field of inorganic complexes and their biomedical applications, particularly for magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and for nucleic acid modifications.

John W. Olesik The Ohio State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of analytical chemistry, particularly in optical spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

Nicola Pohl Indiana University: For distinguished contributions to the automation of oligosaccharide synthesis, production of noncovalent fluorous-interaction-based microarrays, and de novo mass spectrometry analysis of isobaric sugars.

Daniel Raftery University of Washington: For distinguished contributions to the fields of metabolomics and nuclear magnetic resonance, especially for advanced analytical methods with applications in biomarker discovery and cancer diagnosis.

Michael D. Sevilla Oakland University: For distinguished contributions to the field of radiation effects on biomolecules using computational chemistry, particularly for work employing innovative applications of modern theoretical methods.

David S. Sholl Georgia Tech: For seminal contributions in connecting atomic-scale modeling with practical applications in chemical separations, energy storage and data reproducibility.

Sara E. Skrabalak Indiana University: For her significant contributions to nanomaterial synthesis and design, and her advocacy for access and advancement for students and faculty who are underrepresented in science.

Brian Space North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions in theoretical chemistry including insights into interfaces and porous materials, particularly developing theories of nonlinear spectroscopy and force fields in complex systems.

Raymond C. Stevens University of Southern California: For the development of technologies to significantly accelerate protein structure determination and drug discovery, including GPCRs, that have led to new biological insights and therapeutics.

James M. Takacs University of Nebraska-Lincoln: For distinguished contributions to synthetic organic chemistry, commitment to mentoring and excellence in postsecondary chemical education, and the advancement of science through academic administration.

Chuanbing Tang University of South Carolina: For distinguished contributions to the field of polymer chemistry, particularly for sustainable polymers and charged metallopolymers.

H. Holden Thorp Science family of journals: For distinguished contributions to research in inorganic chemistry, leadership roles at two great American research universities, and stewardship of the Science family of journals.

Gregory Tschumper University of Mississippi: For distinguished contributions in the fields of physical chemistry and computational quantum chemistry, including seminal studies of water clusters, hydrogen bonding and non-covalent interactions.

Christopher D. Vanderwal University of California, Irvine: For distinguished contributions to the field of organic chemistry, particularly for efficient chemical synthesis of bioactive active alkaloids and chlorinated natural products.

Nathalie A. Wall University of Florida: For distinguished contribution to the field of radiochemistry, particularly for experimental work on the fate of radionuclides in the environment.

Rory Waterman University of Vermont: For innovative research in synthetic main group chemistry, particularly bond formation catalyzed by transition metals, and his work developing the careers of chemistry faculty.

Charles Weschler Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: For distinguished contributions to the field of indoor chemistry, particularly for improving our understanding of chemicals present in indoor air, their sources and their fate.

Robert F. Williams Los Alamos National Laboratory: For seminal contributions to the field of Bioorganic Chemistry, in particular stable isotope labeling as well as detection and mitigation of chemical and biological threats.

Frankie Wood-Black Northern Oklahoma College: Recognized for her work in in the areas of sustainability, chemical health and safety and science communication to the general public.

Karen Wooley Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the fields of organic and polymer chemistry, particularly for the synthesis and applications of two-dimensional polymers and porous polymer networks.

Peidong Yang University of California, Berkeley: For his pioneering work on semiconductor nanowire-based technology, including molecularly designed nanosystems to solve some of the most vexing energy problems of our time.

SECTION ON DENTISTRY AND ORAL HEALTH SCIENCES

Renny Theodore Franceschi University of Michigan: For distinguished contributions to the fields of transcriptional control mechanisms of bone formation, signaling and extracellular matrix biology of osteoblast differentiation, teaching and service.

Dennis F. Mangan Chalk Talk Science Project: For distinguished contributions to Dental and Oral health research, science administration, teaching and science communication.

Frank C. Nichols University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine: For distinguished contributions to the field of periodontology, particularly his seminal work in determining the role of bacterial lipids in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

Stefan Hans-Klaus Ruhl University at Buffalo, the State University of New York: For distinguished contributions to the oral biology field, particularly for work on glycan-mediated microbial adhesion in the oral cavity.

SECTION ON EDUCATION

James Bell Center for Advancing of Informal Science Education: For his distinguished work building capacity and infrastructure to promote broadening participation in STEM through informal science education.

Michael J. Dougherty GenomEducation Consulting / University of Colorado School of Medicine: For exemplary contributions to biology education, particularly in human genetics, and for vigorous defense of the teaching of evolution.

John Kermit Haynes Morehouse College: For distinguished contributions to national efforts to enhance STEM diversity, remarkable contributions to science education and training and significant research in cell biology.

Henry Vincent Jakubowski College of St. Benedict /St. John’s University: For distinguished contributions to molecular modeling chemistry education and for faculty development in molecular visualization.

Stacey Kiser Lane Community College: For distinguished contributions to leadership in community college education through national and local initiatives.

Richard L. Kopec St. Edward’s University: For distinguished contributions to transforming institutional STEM curricula and for leadership in the STEM institutional change community.

Xiufeng Liu University at Buffalo, the State University of New York: For distinguished contributions to the fields of science education research and communicating and interpreting science to the public.

David J. Marcey California Lutheran University: For distinguished contributions to molecular modeling education and for creation of the online molecular museum and other tools.

Marsha Lakes Matyas Evaluation for Excellence: For distinguished contributions to the field of STEM education, particularly in developing studies, curricular materials, and professional development programs that promote diversity among STEM professionals.

Linda Nicholas-Figueroa I?isa?vik College: For 20 years of excellence in teaching and mentoring Native Alaskan students and for her scholarship on culturally sensitive and place-based approaches to learning science.

Dee Unglaub Silverthorn The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School: For distinguished contributions to the field of STEM education, particularly for early adoption and promotion of active learning technique.

Edward J. Smith Virginia Tech: For distinguished contributions to comparative animal genomics, research education, and diversity in STEM, particularly the training of students from underrepresented groups.

David W. Szymanski Bentley University: For his distinguished work in professional societies on policy, and preparing future business leaders to address the complex challenges of sustainability through systemic change.

Edna Tan University of North Carolina at Greensboro: For her distinguished work in the learning sciences focused on equitable and consequential STEM teaching, and learning targeting individual and collective outcomes among underrepresented populations.

Stephen Young TriCore Reference Laboratories: For distinguished accomplishments in the development of diagnostic tests for bacterial and viral diseases as well as his service to professional societies and teaching.

Hinda Zlotnik Retired: For distinguished leadership and commitment to increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in biomedical research through scientific research administration and public service.

SECTION ON ENGINEERING

Mohammad S. Alam Texas A&M University: For distinguished contributions to the field of pattern recognition, particularly for modeling and development of ultrafast architectures and algorithms for detection, recognition and tracking.

Laura Albert University of Wisconsin-Madison: For distinguished contributions to the application operations research methodologies to public policy, and for communicating her research to the public.

William R. Bickford L’Oréal, Inc.: For his innovative contributions to consumer-based product design through pioneering work in advanced technologies, concepts and products for the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

L. Catherine Brinson Duke University: For distinguished contributions to the field of mechanics of materials, particularly for hierarchical characterization and modeling of nanostructured polymers and shape memory alloys.

Ruben G. Carbonell North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to the field of chemical and biomolecular engineering, particularly innovations in multiphase reactor design, high-pressure thin-film coating, and novel bioseparation processes.

Michael L. Chabinyc University of California, Santa Barbara: For distinguished contributions to the field of polymer science, particularly for elucidating the relationship of the structure and electronic properties of organic semiconductors to device properties.

Manish Chhowalla University of Cambridge (United Kingdom): For distinguished contributions to the field of two-dimensional materials, particularly using phase engineering to study their electronic, electrocatalytic and energy storage properties.

Edwin K.P. Chong Colorado State University: For distinguished contributions to optimization and control theory and methods, particularly for stochastic networks and wireless systems.

Kristen P. Constant Iowa State University: For distinguished contributions to the design and fabrication of photonic structures and her influential role in materials engineering education and broadening participation in STEM disciplines.

Susan Daniel Cornell University: For pioneering work that has yielded new approaches to the study of the biophysical interactions at cellular membranes, particularly involving microvesicles and viruses.

Angela Phillips Diaz University of California, San Diego: For her outstanding leadership, commitment to excellence, and dedication to public service through advocacy to advance science, engineering, and innovation.

Elizabeth C. Dickey North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to materials engineering research and education, particularly for the utilization of electron microscopy techniques for quantifying atomic- to micrometer-scale structure of materials.

Peter S. Fedkiw North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to electrochemical engineering, including electrochemical-based mass transfer separation processes, optimal control of electrochemical reactors and composite electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries.

Eric M. Furst University of Delaware: For seminal contributions to a range of topics in soft matter science and engineering, with a particular focus on colloid science and rheology.

Sharon Gerecht Johns Hopkins University: For distinguished contributions to the field of biochemical engineering, particularly establishing dynamics of cellular microenvironments for vascular differentiation and tissue regeneration.

Richard D. Gitlin University of South Florida: For seminal discoveries in the co-invention of DSL (digital subscriber line), which made the Internet possible via telephone networks, and in wireless communication and networking.

Michael C. Jewett Northwestern University: For distinguished contributions to the field of engineering, particularly using synthetic biology and cell-free systems to enable new applications in biomanufacturing, diagnostics, and education.

Vistasp M. Karbhari The University of Texas at Arlington: For distinguished contributions to the field of composites in civil infrastructure particularly in low-cost processing, durability and damage tolerance, rehabilitation and multi-threat mitigation.

Michael R. Kessler North Dakota State University: For distinguished contributions to the understanding and development of self-healing composites and bio-renewable polymers.

Behrokh Khoshnevis University of Southern California: For innovations in manufacturing and construction, including the application of 3-D printing methods.

Kristi L. Kiick University of Delaware: For contributions to the synthesis and application of peptide-based self-assembled materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery, and administrative leadership at University of Delaware.

Catherine Klapperich Boston University: For distinguished contributions to the field of biomedical engineering, particularly the development of integrated microsystems for point-of-care diagnosis of disease for global and women’s health.

Gerhard Klimeck Purdue University: For the quantum mechanical modeling theory and simulation tools to design today’s nanotransistors and for leadership of the global nanotechnology community as Director of nanoHUB.

Sanjay Kumar University of California, Berkeley: For distinguished contributions to the field of bioengineering, particularly the development of biomaterial and single-cell technologies to investigate mechanobiological signaling in health and disease.

Ju Li Massachusetts Institute of Technology: For pioneering work on understanding the fundamental properties of ultra-strength materials and development of elastic strain engineering.

JoAnn Slama Lighty Boise State University: For impactful contributions to academics and scholarship through administration, air quality research, and professional service, within the context of diversity and inclusion.

Ivan M. Lorkovi? Raytheon Vision Systems: For outstanding contributions to major advances in chemistry, catalysis, materials and space systems engineering, and commitment to providing societal benefits in service, education and mentorship.

Laura Marcu University of California, Davis: For research and development of optical instrumentation and techniques for tissue spectroscopy and imaging, with applications in management of critical human disease and regenerative medicine.

Sudip K. Mazumder University of Illinois at Chicago: For distinguished contributions to the field of multi-scale control and analysis of power-electronic systems.

Triantafillos (Lakis) Mountziaris University of Massachusetts Amherst: For significant research contributions in the synthesis of nanostructured photonic materials and for national research leadership impacting the science and engineering community.

Uday B. Pal Boston University: For pioneering work providing novel materials-based solutions in the field of green engineering as applied to energy conversion and primary production of materials.

Ah-Hyung (Alissa) Park Columbia University: For outstanding research and professional contributions to developing the fundamental understanding of reactions and materials for carbon dioxide capture, utilization and storage.

Hridesh Rajan Iowa State University: For distinguished contributions to data driven science, particularly to modularity and modular reasoning in computer software and the development of the Boa language and infrastructure.

Gintaras Reklaitis Purdue University: For leading contributions to process systems engineering, including batch processing, supply chain and enterprise-wide optimization and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and for achievements in education and service.

Robert Oliver Ritchie University of California, Berkeley: For distinguished contributions to the understanding of the fracture of materials and structures, from metals, ceramics and composites to aircraft, medical devices and biological materials.

J. Paul Robinson Purdue University: For distinguished contributions to the field of advanced cytometric analysis and expanding cellular and microbial detection technologies.

Nancy R. Sottos University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: For outstanding and sustained contributions to the experimental mechanics of materials and for pioneering contributions and initiating the new field of autonomous materials systems.

Georgia (Gina) D. Tourassi Oak Ridge National Laboratory: For distinguished contribution in biomedical informatics, particularly using artificial intelligence for diagnostic interpretation of medical images and clinical natural language processing.

Paul J. Turinsky North Carolina State University: For distinguished contributions to nuclear engineering, particularly the development of simulation technology for the safety, economic operation and life extension of nuclear power facilities.

John L. Volakis Florida International University: For leadership in engineering education, authorship of important texts, game-changing contributions to electromagnetics, and for developing and transitioning hybrid finite element into commercial tool sets.

Qing Wang Penn State: For distinguished contributions to the field of polymers and composites, particularly for the development of ferroelectric polymers and dielectric materials for energy storage and conversion.

Lan Yang Washington University in St. Louis: For groundbreaking contributions to the fields of photonics, particularly for pioneering experimental studies on non-Hermitian photonics, optical sensing, and light-matter interactions in optical resonators.

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For Part 2 of this announcement, click here.

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