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Monday, June 24, 2019
Food is, generally speaking, a good thing. In addition to being quite tasty, it is also necessary for survival. That's why animals have evolved robust physiological systems that attract them to food and keep them coming back for...
In 1989, two undergraduate students at the Free University of Brussels were asked to test frozen blood serum from camels, and stumbled on a previously unknown kind of antibody. It was a miniaturized version of a human antibody,...
It was once believed that mammals were born with the entire supply of neurons they would have for a lifetime. However, over the past few decades, neuroscientists have found that at least two brain regions -- the centers...
A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough. Recently published in the medical publication, the American Journal of Obstetrics...
In 1982, researchers reported a link between chronic gastritis and stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori, triggering a flurry of research into this newly-identified pathogen. These studies made it clear that in addition to its involvement in gastritis, H. pylori...
University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell "landscape" of bowel cancer tumours, paving the way towards more individualised medicine and treatment for many other diseases in future. In a paper recently published and...
Purkinje cells are a central part of the human cerebellum, the part of the brain that plays an important role in motor learning, fine motor control of the muscle, equilibrium and posture but also influences emotions, perception, memory...
Scientists have captured the first "snapshot" of two proteins involved in delivering a bacterial stress-response master regulator to the cell's recycling machinery. The Brown University-led team found that RssB -- a protein that specifically recognizes the master regulator and...
Using strong and targeted but noninvasive magnets at specific sites in the brains of people with and without mild learning and memory problems, Johns Hopkins researchers report they were able to detect differences in the concentrations of brain...

Top News

Hey ISIS, You Suck: Local Muslims Post Anti-ISIS Billboard

A new billboard on Manchester Road in Missouri reads, "HEY ISIS, YOU SUCK!!! From: #ActualMuslims." A group of Muslim-Americans have put up a blunt billboard...

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